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Source : Hypotheses.org

Collaborative comparative linguistics via specialist consortia

Haspelmath, Martin (10 sept. 2012)

To compare many different (including little-studied) languages around the world, comparative linguists need access to good data, which is often difficult to get. Many research questions cannot be answered easily by consulting reference works such as dictionaries and grammars. We often see some ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

A special kind of transitivity marking in Kerinci Malay

Haspelmath, Martin (23 mars 2012)

Like other Western Austronesian languages, Malay is well-known for its symmetrical voice system, but in this paper, McKinnon et al. (2011) report on something quite different in a little known Malay variety, Kerinci Malay, spoken in a valley near Mount Kerinci, the highest volcano of Indonesia. ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

A proposal for the glossing of bound formatives without committing to their nature

Grossman, Eitan (29 juin 2015)

Martin Haspelmath (2011) has argued that the notion ‘word’ is incoherent, and therefore is not useful as a cross-linguistically valid comparative concept or as a language-internal descriptive category. As a result, in his view, the distinction between bound formatives, e.g., affixes and clitics, ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

C. Everett's ejectives/altitude correlation is not significant

haraldhammarstroem (17 juin 2013)

I've now had a chance to take a closer look at Caleb Everett's recent PLoS ONE article on the correlation between ejective consonants and altitude, and I think the ejective distribution is explainable on purely classical grounds, that is, common inheritance and areal diffusion. That is, it is NOT ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

Sound inventories and population size

gerhardjaeger (8 juin 2013)

When I had lunch with two phoneticians the other day, the question came up whether there is a correlation between the size of the phoneme inventory of a language and its population size. Neither of us knew, and we started to speculate in which direction it should go. My guess was that larger ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

Ideophones, expressiveness and grammatical integration, or: how morphosyntax can depend on mode of communication

Dingemanse, Mark (19 oct. 2016)

Ideophones —vivid sensory words found in many of the world’s languages— are often described as having little or no morphosyntax. That simple statement conceals an interesting puzzle. It is not often that we can define a word class across languages in terms of its syntax (or lack thereof). ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

Need and Have, again

Jacques, Guillaume (27 janv. 2014)

Almost two years ago, I posted on DLC a comment on an article published in Linguistic Inquiry: http://dlc.hypotheses.org/159 After posting, I was contacted by Richard Kayne himself, and had rich discussions with him. This encouraged me to turn the posting into an article. I co-wrote it with my ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

The growing pains of pragmatic typology

Dingemanse, Mark (10 juil. 2014)

Six months ago a linguistic factoid made global headlines: ‘huh?’ is a universal word. The New York Times described it as “the syllable that everyone recognises” and for the Süddeutsche Zeitung it was “the most important word in the world” because of its role in solving communicative ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

Dictionaries as open-access databases: A vision

Haspelmath, Martin (27 févr. 2014)

Like many other media, dictionaries have tended to move into the internet, and many people nowadays use online dictionaries for everyday purposes (e.g. LEO, which has popular online dictionaries for translation between German and a number of widely spoken languages). Scientific, high-profile ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

An inflection/derivation distinction on the other side of the globe?

Haspelmath, Martin (12 mai 2013)

There is a tradition of dividing all of (non-compounding) morphology into inflection and derivation in European languages, and like other European traditions, this one has been carried over to languages around the world. But on what basis? There are clear cases of inflection and derivation where ...

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