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Source : Hypotheses.org

"R" for Refashioning Fashion Plates in Early Modern Europe. Pascale Cugy & Corinne Thépaut-Cabasset

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (27 oct. 2016)

To the anonymous mannequins standing in fashion plates, the Bonnarts rapidly added portraits of high- ranking people from the Court. Repeating the same formal codes, these “portraits in mode” speculated on the celebrity of people from the Court, by adding to the stereotype image of a young and ...

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"T" for Traditional Mexican Woman Dress called: Huipil. Lena Bjerregaard, Conservator, Guest Researcher, Centre for Textile Research/SAXO Institute, University of Copenhagen

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (20 déc. 2016)

The lady on this Casta painting is wearing a huipil (from Aztec: huipilli) – the pre-Columbian and contemporary native women costume in Mexico and Mesoamerica. De chino cambujo e india, Ioba, Casta Painting, Miguel Cabrera, Mexico, 1763, oil on canvas, 134 x 101 cm, Madrid, Museo de América, inv. ...

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"S" for Stockings for children. Charlotte Rimstad, Ph. D. Student, Centre for Textile Research, University of Copenhagen

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (16 août 2016)

Fig. 1. Child stocking with anthropomorphic clock. KBM 3827 RHP, FO213753  Fig. 2. Stocking for a child, with the garter sewn on. 1941:146C Fig. 3. Heel in garter stitches on a child stocking. KBM 1455 x1 Stockings for children are rarely found in museum collections, but they do exist. The Museum ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

“L” IS FOR LYON. THE MARKETING AMBITIONS OF EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY FRENCH MERCHANT MANUFACTURERS, OR WHERE DID ALL THE LYONNAIS SILKS GO? LESLEY MILLER, SENIOR CURATOR OF TEXTILES, VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM, LONDON/PROFESSOR OF DRESS AND TEXTILE HISTORY, UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (31 déc. 2016)

Lyon in the south-east of France was by the late 17th century the silk-weaving capital of Europe, its products ranging from simple, lightweight plain silks to elaborate brocaded silks woven with silver and gold. It was to these patterned silks that the city owed its reputation, as designers created ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

"F" for Fan: Fashionable fans. PhD Georgina Letourmy-Bordier, Fan Expert

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (4 juil. 2016)

Folding Fan with ivory serpentine sticks and painted silk palmettes, circa 1680s.©The Fan Museum, Hélène Alexander Collection (Greenwich, London) Folding Fan with ivory serpentine sticks and painted silk palmettes, circa 1680s.©The Fan Museum, Hélène Alexander Collection (Greenwich, London) ...

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Source : Hypotheses.org

“H” for Headdress: The Gandaya, a colourful silk knitted bonnet in Global-Spain. Victoria de Lorenzo, MA alumni at the Royal College of Art/Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (5 nov. 2016)

According to the 1803 dictionary of the Real Academia Española, gandaya meant both ‘type of hair bonnet’ and ‘mischievous, idle, free living’. No scholar has ever paid attention to the relationship between these two meanings and the majismo. The gandaya was a headdress usually knitted, ...

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“C” for Court Dress: An elaborate masterpiece made of green silk velvet, 1780-1790. Laura G. García-Vedrenne, Conservator, National Museum of History, Mexico

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (24 août 2016)

“Besides, the consumption of all sorts of silk fabrics should be seen in Mexico as the main point of its commerce; clergy men, gentlemen, merchants, bourgeois, artisans, craftsmen and even Africans and mulatto, they all dress in silk for most part of the year. Therefore Spain, together with France ...

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“N” for Night Gown: The Informal Gown of a Lady Wear. A customized fashion plate circa 1700: Dame de la Cour en « déshabillé négligé ». Pascale Cugy, Docteur in History of Art, University of Paris-Sorbonne

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (18 oct. 2016)

Les quatre frères Bonnart, nés entre 1637 et 1654 à Paris, sont particulièrement célèbres pour leurs images de vêtements, produites en grande quantité à partir des années 1680 et considérées comme les premières estampes à pouvoir vraiment prétendre au titre de « gravures de mode » ...

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“S” for Stockings: Made in Europe – but where? Edwina Ehrman, Curator of Textiles and Fashion, Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (8 juil. 2016)

Pair of women's stockings of knitted silk, made in Spain, mid 18th Century. London, Victoria and Albert Museum, T.156-1971 Detail, pair of women's stockings of knitted silk, made in Spain, mid 18th Century. London, Victoria and Albert Museum, T.156-1971 Detail, pair of women's stockings of knitted ...

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“S” for Shoes: A gendered shoe from 17th century-Copenhagen. Vivi Lena Andersen, Curator and Archaeologist at the Museum of Copenhagen, Denmark

Thepaut-Cabasset, Corinne (22 janv. 2017)

Shoes were invented 40.000 years ago. Presumably for protection against extreme cold, hot or rocky surfaces and poisonous animals and plants, but shoes became much more than a simple garment for protection. It also became a tool for social survival. Male Shoe, Leather, 17th century, Museum of ...

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